Concert-Goers Paid More to See “Oldies but Goodies” over “Current” Artists in 2013

history-of-eagles-tour

Only three “current” artists made our list of the Top 10 Most Expensive Concert tickets bought on the secondary market. We often discuss the “average price” of a ticket, referring to the average list price on razorgator.com from sellers. Today, let’s talk about how much fans are actually spending on concert tickets at checkout.

Which Artists are Fans Paying Most to See Live?

Live shows have become more and more of an experience for fans. Lights, dancers, projections, moving stages, circus animals; “current” artists are going all out to entertain their audiences. The “Oldies but Goodies” are making their final rounds on the touring scene, capturing their audiences’ attention with film of past shows, anniversary celebrations, and long sets of classic hits over the years. Concert goers (or their parents) are willing to spend big dollars to see their favorite artists when they come to town for the must-see event.

rolling-stones-tour

At number one on our list, Rolling Stones fans spent an average of $670 per ticket to see their 50 and Counting Tour last year. With only 23 shows in North America, there was a shortage of supply on Rolling Stone tickets. Couple that with the fans high demand to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the band, the average asking price of a ticket was close to $1000.

While Eagles fans rank second in average price per ticket spent at a concert in 2013, they spent 44% less per ticket than Rolling Stones fans. Following Don Henley’s announcements that this could be the band’s last major tour (at least until 2015) and Bernie Leadon’s would be touring with the band, History of the Eagles tour tickets jumped in ask price an average of $54. Eagles’ enthusiasts were hyped, willing to pay a little extra to see the original guitarist on stage and the group together for possibly the last time in the near future.

Also celebrating 50 years as a professional musician, Eric Clapton kicked off a tour in the States. The three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame performed 17 shows beginning in March and culminating in New York City with the two-night Crossroads Guitar Festival at Madison Square Garden in mid-April. A majority of Eric Clapton’s tour dates were at Arenas in the South and on the East Coast. Like the Rolling Stones, the limited number of shows from the legendary guitarist at a pinnacle time in his career, had fans paying high prices for their concert tickets.

one-direction-tour

Beyoncé, One Direction, and Maroon 5 fans are among our Top 10 spenders when it comes to concert ticket purchases. These three “current” artists also sold a substantial amount of tickets, making our list of Top 10 in tickets sold. To be fair, “current” artists typically go on extensive tours, allowing fans a greater number of options and a supply pool much larger than some of the “Oldies but Goodies.” Beyoncé played 44 U.S. shows in 2013, 1D 41, and Maroon 5 66 (34 12th Annual Honda Civic Tour, 32 Overexposed Tour). At No. 10, Maroon 5 fans spent an average $272 per ticket.

The below chart illustrates which artist’s fans are paying the most to see in concert.

Artist Price per Ticket
Rolling Stones 1
Eagles 2
Eric Clapton 3
Celine Dion 4
George Strait 5
One Direction 6
Fleetwood Mac 7
Beyonce 8
Paul McCartney 9
Maroon 5 10

Image Credits: Charles Gallay (Getty Images), MarySavanna, http://h-atb.tumblr.com/

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Posted in Concerts
One comment on “Concert-Goers Paid More to See “Oldies but Goodies” over “Current” Artists in 2013
  1. Charlie Phillips says:

    The oldies bands are great in concert and are not stuck to a 1 1/2 concert like current bands. The Eagles 3 1/2 hour concert, Elton John 3 hour concerts, Paul McCartney 3 hour concerts. All worth the money. Older the band more hits, more hits longer concerts.

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